Saturday, December 31, 2011

Limited Time Access-New Bind-Off Technique

As promised, the Bind off technique previously posted here has been removed.  If you absolutely must have it, please contact me and I will forward it to you by e-mail.  There is no charge for this--I just took the video off because it makes loading time for this blog too long.

Oh yeah, happy NEW YEAR!!!


Saturday, December 10, 2011

Honeyberry has learned to knit!

Let me introduce Honeyberry.  She is Huckleberry's good friend, and she just learned to knit!  She'd like to share a revolutionary type of knitting pattern with you.  It's called an UP-attern, and it's way easy!
To get a FREE copy of her pattern, just e-mail: and ask for it!  That's all there is to it!  (Isn't her scarf beautiful?)

Tuesday, November 29, 2011

To Knit or Crochet~That is the Question.



Now that we've rounded up some fabulous domestic yarns, there looms a primary question.  What should we do with it?  Two excellent choices are knitting and crochet.  Each has its own properties and uses, and knowing them is a great help in decision making.  Another popular question is the difficulty levels involved.  Lastly, fiber cost may be a consideration.

To be very brief, crochet is a series of knots and knitting is a series of loops.

This makes the texture of crochet more naturally bumpy, and the texture of knitting more naturally smoother.  Depending on what you plan to make, these attributes may be important.  

As to the difficulty of the knitting process (two needles)  as compared to the crocheting process (one hook), surprisingly, they are both about the same.  They each require two hands, and they each center around one main stitch.  Crochet is based on making chains, and knitting centers around the "knit" stitch, which is a method of intertwining the yarn by looping it.

Cost considerations involve the amount of yarn required to accomplish the craft.  Crochet takes about twice as much fiber as knitting.  This is because each stitch is worked much like knotting.

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Yarn is Here (Finally)

Black Sheep Northville is proud to introduce the addition of their first line of yarns.  Check out their site for the next few weeks as more and more of the lovely line of Cestari yarns are added!

Friday, November 11, 2011

Carpet Stains and Smells no more!

'Nuff Said? 

1.  Soak up moisture.
2.  Squirt with Hydrogen Peroxide  (Kroger has great price and it comes in a squirt bottle)

BONUS:  This also gets up other stains the same way!

More info at:

Wednesday, November 9, 2011

Staples Can Be DANGEROUS

I’ found out my fear of staples is well founded.  To read why, check out my other blog at: .*

*I'm trying not to duplicate information on my two blogs.  If you find having to jump somewhere else irritating, let me know and I'll think of another way--after all, I'm new at this. is TOO a word!

Cusp of a Mountain
I’d like to compliment you on your astute verbal conscience.  However, you may lay to rest any doubts about the word, "cusp".  Sounds cool, doesn't it?  Cusp.  Try saying it out loud.  Say it several times with unvarying intonations.  I know! It's awesome, isn't it?

Plus, the really great news is it's a real word.  (Official definition follows)      

I chose to use it in the title of this blog for several reasons, including:

* I really like to make people use their minds, and I thought this would peak a little curiosity.
* It accents the tintillating feelings fiber-artists get when "talking shop".
* It describes my honest feeling about needle arts.  I think they're          
                               C O O L. 

DEFINITION according to Uncle Noah:noun \ˈkəsp\: point, apex: asa : a point of transition (as from one historical period to the next) : turning point; also : edge, verge  cusp of stardom b : either horn of a crescent moon c : a fixed point on a mathematical curve at which a point tracing the curve would exactly reverse its direction of motion d : an ornamental pointed projection formed by or arising from the intersection of two arcs or foils e (1) : a point on the grinding surface of a tooth (2) : a fold or flap of a cardiac valve.